Break Free From The Job Search Grind This Independence Day

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Take your life back, have more time and free yourself from the monotonous work of trying to land your dream job.

Let it go. We’ve got this.

Fridayd will not only find the most relevant job opportunities for you. We’ll complete and submit applications on your behalf, discover networking connections for targeted companies, track all of your processes and keep your job search moving.

No one wants to be shackled with the tedium of finding a new job. And you don’t have to be.

Register now to let Fridayd manage your search and take advantage of our Independence Day special rate of $39 for our standard plan or $69 for our premium plan.

And, hey, you’re not bound to stay with us. If you don’t like the results you get with Fridayd, you are free to cancel at any time.

*Offer ends Saturday, July 8.

 

Tips on Sidestepping the Salary History Question: New Legislation Helps

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In the recent past, some cities and states have already passed legislation to prevent employers from asking job candidates their salary history. It’s a great move for a couple of reasons.

Originally designed to promote equal pay for equal work, such legal measures go beyond attempts to narrow the pay gap for women in the workplace. All job seekers, regardless of gender, should understand how unfair the salary question is and know how to avoid it, especially in cities and states yet to prohibit it.

Your current or past salary has no bearing on what you should be paid in a new position. Period.

What should determine your salary?

The scope of responsibilities in the new position combined with the fair market value for the geographical region in which you will work should be the first factors in deciding salary. Next, levels of experience and expertise weigh in to setting compensation for a role.

Don’t go into an interview without knowing your worth based on market research. There are plenty of online tools, such as PayScale and Glassdoor, to help you calculate your value. But better yet, if your region doesn’t have legislation banning salary history questions, employ some sidestepping strategies.

Many companies request current and past salaries in their online applications. Leave that section blank if it is not a required field. If it is mandatory, you won’t be able to leave that field incomplete, but you can try using all zeros to bypass the system, leaving that question for later in the interview stage.

It’s true that some companies like to have your salary history to make sure your salary expectations don’t exceed their set range for a position and that time isn’t wasted interviewing non-viable candidates. The assumption is that a candidate with a higher salary won’t be satisfied receiving less. That’s not always accurate, however. Many employees find job satisfaction in the work that they do, not just the compensation they receive. An employer can avoid this altogether by being upfront about the salary range for the position. You can then indicate if that range is acceptable to you.

Your first interview with a company will most likely be a screening call with a recruiter, who in most cases will inquire about your salary. You’re in the hot seat. How do you respond without angering the recruiter by withholding information? You can kindly answer the question with some variation of the following:

  • Don’t provide your current salary, but rather provide the recruiter with your salary requirements. What you require and what the hiring company is willing to pay are the only aspects that need to be considered in ascertaining if your salary expectations are a fit for moving forward.
  • Ask for the salary range, or provide a range in which you are willing to consider for the role.
  • Provide a range for your current salary just like the hiring company does for the position they are trying to fill. There is nothing wrong with stating that your existing salary is in the fair market value range for the scope of your responsibilities and that your salary expectations are based on the job requirements and your level of experience. A company worth joining will compensate its employees accordingly.

No one likes the salary question or the salary negotiation stages of job searching. Companies in the know and those that compensate fairly will avoid asking for salary history and instead pay for the value of the job and the experience of the person filling it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Slick Way to Fly Your Job Search Under the Radar

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When you already have a job but are looking for another one, there is some good advice on how to keep you search under the radar and not send any red flags to an existing employer. Many tips, such as those offered by Forbes in “How To Conduct A Successful Stealth Job Search (Without Getting Fired),” may seem like common sense, yet those seeking new employment may not take them into consideration in their haste to move their job search along.

Another way to keep a job search on the QT and not risk its intrusion into your current job is to allow experts to manage your job search for you. With over 40 million passive, white-collar job seekers looking for new opportunities every month in the US, there is stiff competition for available jobs. In addition to adding hours to your day before or after work for your search, it can be tempting to try to stay on top of your search during work hours.

The reality is, you don’t have to, and there is every good reason not to, including a more efficient and less stressful job search experience.

Fridayd emerged as a way to primarily help passive job seekers by using technology combined with human support to take away the burden of searching for a new job while already employed. Using its unique approach, Fridayd:

  • conducts your search for you, while you stay focused on the job at hand
  • follows companies of interest for you
  • submits resumes and completes applications on your behalf
  • finds the appropriate networking connections for targeted companies
  • reduces online job search time to 30 minutes or less per week

You can keep your job search moving full steam ahead effectively and without drawing attraction to your planned exit ahead. While your sitting in a meeting with colleagues, you can secretly smile, knowing your job search is taking place behind the scenes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The No-nonsense Guide to Networking Anyone Can Follow

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Networking is tops in business – and especially in searching for a new job. Yet, the very thought of cold introductions and engaging with a crowd of strangers isn’t everyone’s idea of fun. For all but the most extroverted professional, assertive initiatives, shaking hands and striking up conversations feels like work, especially when there is an agenda attached.

Networking doesn’t have to be so hard, though, advises Carlos Paz, CEO of Fridayd. For most people, one-on-one interactions are easier and more gratifying. To that end, think of your connections as individual touch points to start and nurture relationships because relationship-building is what networking in all about.

“Most people view networking as attending large-scale or formal events designed just for that purpose. Those events are great, but you may be able to make more headway with a more targeted approach when it comes to searching for a new job,” said Paz.

You can network anytime and anywhere with people you connect with in your daily life. Just mentioning your interest in landing a new position in casual conversations can be a great opener to discover new opportunities. Everyone knows someone who knows someone. You can be more deliberate in your approach, though, by connecting with people you think may have greater insights into available jobs.

Follow these easy steps to build targeted networking into your daily job search activities:

  • Reach out to one existing contact everyday by phone or email to stay in touch and ask about job openings they may be aware of. Ask if you can share your resume and if the connection will forward it on if he/she learns of a suitable opening. Email is a less-threating way to connect that even the most introverted job seeker can undertake. However, nothing beats an actual conversation by phone or in person. Continually rotate through your list of contacts so you stay top of mind with your friends, former colleagues and business associates.
  • Schedule lunch or coffee two times a week with existing contacts to nurture the relationships and discuss your search.
  • Find one activity of interest a week to get you out and mingling. It doesn’t have to be a business networking event. You can meet people pursuing any passion or interest. What’s key is weaving in the right job search questions in your conversations.
  • Strike up conversations with neighbors about positions you are seeking.
  • Directly email a recruiter at companies you apply to. Don’t just apply and think you’ve done all that you can do. Get your foot in the door, introduce yourself and start a relationship through email or even by phone. Note, however, that most recruiters may screen incoming calls. You may have a better chance grabbing attention with email.
  • Work your LinkedIn contacts like a honey badger. Don’t just reach out once. Check back often to see if your contacts know of any emerging positions. Ask for introductions to second and third connections who may be helpful in your search. Most professionals are willing to help, and you may get a chance to return the favor down the road. Don’t be shy about asking for assistance.
  • Research and discover recruiters at targeted companies that don’t currently have an open position. Introduce yourself and share your resume. Many positions don’t make it to the job posting stage. You can raise awareness of your interest and credentials in the event that a position does become available.

Face-to-face encounters are superior for connecting and creating new relationships in your job search, but you can still make an impression, form new alliances and nurture your contacts in other ways. “The most important thing,” said Paz, “is that you make networking a primary part of your job search activities and that you don’t slack in this area. There are so many communications channels to take advantage of; even super socially inhibited professionals can network easily.”

 

 

 

6 Tips to Prevent Burning Bridges When You Leave a Job

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The best way to leave a job that’s not working out is a voluntary exit. You resign, serve out your final weeks and gracefully walk away with relationships intact and in good standing. That’s the ideal, but it frequently doesn’t work out that way.

Companies let employees go for myriad of reasons: poor performance, personality differences, incompatible work styles or goals, decreased budgets, downsizing, mergers and acquisitions, etc. Employees exiting a company for these reasons can still leave with poise and dignity while preserving relationships.

Understandably, losing a job for any reason causes hurt, anger and grief, but feelings can be put aside for your greater long-term good. The following tips will help you if you find yourself in the position of losing a job.

  1. Regardless of whether you think you deserve to lose your job or not, accept the company’s decision; don’t fight it. Ask questions to clarify the reasons for the decision and to determine if there is something you could have done differently, but don’t let anger lead your ego into a caustic exchange of words that you can never take back. By the time your manager or the company gives you notice, the decision is already set in stone.
  2. Keep negativity at bay. Just as if you were leaving by choice, thank the manager or human resources representative for the opportunity you had to contribute and work together.
  3. Ask if there are any options to continue working on a contract basis. Even when a company lets an employee go because of team fit or personality conflicts, the employee’s talent may still be valued. If you can negotiate such a deal, it enables you to state on your resume that you are still employed in some capacity.
  4. Companies don’t like to fire employees. Those who conduct the termination may experience their own guilt and bad feelings. Ask if they have any referrals that can help you in your job search. You could be surprised by their willingness to help.
  5. Say only good things about the company and the people you no longer will work with. Refrain from writing a damaging Glassdoor review or making any destructive comments on social media. You may feel better in the moment that you are venting, but such airing of emotions only hurts you in the long run.
  6. Once you leave, have a cooling-off period before you engage with people who were former employees. It’s tempting to speak poorly of the company or those who let you go. And it keeps you immersed in the event rather than focused on moving forward, learning from the experience and being better for it.

Vow to find the lessons and the good in losing your job. Business relationships don’t always work out, but you can retain the connections you made and leave a position on a more positive note than you might imagine possible.

 

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The Secret to Finding Meaningful Work

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For some job seekers, finding work or a career that is meaningful is a job search objective. However, gratifying work may have multiple meanings from person to person.

Doing work that helps others, improves the world or aids in a human-interest cause is purposeful for many. Saving the planet, healing the sick, or fighting for justice are such altruistic pursuits. Yet others find meaning in being highly challenged to grow a company or generate more wealth.

An artist, musician, actor or writer may find meaning in the creative process, akin to how many feel using their dominant traits or skills, e.g., math, science, construction, mechanical, communication skills, etc.

Work seems to be most meaningful when you can combine top interests, skills and natural talents. Time flies and there is a sense of “flow” in the activities of work. It’s an almost magical experience in which work doesn’t feel like work.

But not everyone has that experience of work, nor the opportunity to spend their days immersed in what interests them most and to collect a paycheck for it. As it turns out, though, all work can have meaning with the right approach to it.

What’s the secret to making all work purposeful?

Just doing good work can create a sense of meaning and increased gratification. Likewise, viewing interactions with coworkers, customers and business partners as acts of service and kindness can bring joy and purpose to any job. Knowing that your work is contributing to building a company that provides for the livelihood of all its employees has worth, and doing the job before you, whatever it is, to support loved ones can have great import.

Oddly enough, trying to discover true interests or passions as they relate to work can also cause added pressure when searching for a new job. It’s a luxury that wasn’t always afforded to past generations.

Everyone wants to find their dream job, but almost everyone will at times do work that is not their ideal gig. Meaningful work, like many things, often depends on the attitude and gusto brought to it.

 

 

 

 

 

Take a Load Off Your Job Search

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What? You can have more fun and free time while finding your next career adventure? Yes, you can!

Vacations are so refreshing. You take a break from work, have fun and spend more time with the ones you love.

Fridayd for job search is just like that!

You leave all the work and worry behind and have more time for what matters most in your life.

  • Professional job search is done for you; Fridayd delivers the most relevant job postings from across the web and targeted company websites
  • With your approval, applications are submitted on your behalf
  • Networking connections are researched and provided to you
  • All job search activities are organized on one easy-to-access dashboard

On a mobile device, it’s just tap, touch and done. You can manage your job search processes in 30 minutes or less per week.

Get started now for a more carefree life and summer while your job search stays on track.

 

 

How Your Storytelling Could Impact Your Job Search

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If you’re sad on the inside, don’t expect to show up happy on the outside.

It’s an amazing phenomenon how our inside world gets projected outwardly. We seemingly communicate the way we think and feel not just in words and non-verbals by the way we carry ourselves, facial expressions and overall body language, but also in the confidence, energy and well-being we exude without our knowledge. What’s even more interesting is that it’s hard to mask a negative self-perception with external appearances. What’s buried inside leaks out subtly in expressions we may be unaware of and that others pick up on.

It’s almost as if there is an invisible communication and energy field that operates of its own accord and relays the context of our inner dialogue – the story we inwardly tell about ourselves.

Most people can relate to the following experience. You’re miffed at a friend, colleague or spouse, without his/her knowing that you’re angry. You camouflage what you are thinking with a smile and pleasantries and act as if nothing is wrong. Yet, tension builds. You can feel it, almost cut it with a knife. You can’t swim out of the undercurrent of your thoughts and feelings. They can pull you under even if the surface looks calm.

Our self-narrative is especially important when we seek a new career opportunity. It says more about us than we can say with words.

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This is more than just self talk, though. The inner ongoing story of success or failure we choose to feed ourselves creates the way we feel, and those feelings turn into an identity we relay to others, despite what our words, credentials and crisp new suit might say to the contrary.

Get yourself in the right frame of mind by adjusting your vision of yourself for your job search. Keeping a positive self-image when a job search goes on and on can be challenging, but job seekers need to be vigilant about how they interpret, judge and speak to themselves about the circumstances surrounding their search.

If you have to tell yourself a story about yourself, tell a good one!

It’s the one everyone else will hear too when they look at you.

No Matter How You Slice It, Here Is the Most Important Piece of the Job Search Pie

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A job search is made up of multiple processes, and some can really soak up more time than they should. What are the most important job search activities and how much time should you spend on each for the most streamlined and effective job search?

Surprisingly, many job seekers have the time allocations backwards and spend a significant amount of time online in their quest for the right job opportunities, with considerably more time apportioned to completing and submitting applications. Those are, unequivocally, the most time-consuming activities, and they have to be done; however, no more than 10 percent of job search time should be spent on them.

Yikes! Where should one allot the remaining 90 percent of time?

Take a look:

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Today’s savvy job seekers know that the majority of their time – at least 60 percent – should be spent networking: reaching out to existing contacts, making new ones and uncovering personnel at hiring companies of interest in order to stand out from other applicants and get a foot in the door.

Those on a quest for new employment should spend about 20 percent of their time researching and preparing for interviews and another 10 percent on actual interviews.

The truth is, most job seekers struggle with whittling down their online activities to a manageable degree in order to fit in the more differentiating actions. Why? Because even if you use job search boards with alerts to bring attention to new postings, job search boards don’t catch all of the opportunities and there are a lot of irrelevant postings to sift through to find the needle in the haystack. Job seekers will still find themselves frequently visiting multiple job search boards and company websites to find ideal opportunities, plus allotting more time for filling out applications. Wash. Rinse. Repeat. It’s exhausting.

As more and more job seekers are learning about the extreme benefits of upping their networking game, they are seeking new and better ways to cut online activity. Fridayd was founded for the sole purpose of freeing job seekers from tedious online activities so they can focus on what matters most and what will give them the most advantages in their search. And it works! Using Fridayd, job seekers can cut online processes to 30 minutes or less a week and save on average 40 hours per month.

That’s a tasty time-cutting treat worth trying!

Dig in and check it out.

Tap, Touch and Done. All Job Searches Should Be This Easy

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Why would a job seeker choose to have Fridayd handle their job search processes? For starters, Fridayd makes online job search activities quick and easy. A job seeker can spend 30 minutes or less per week reviewing and applying to jobs rather than hours and hours. On a mobile device, it’s just tap, touch and you’re done!

So simple.

Compare the difference of Friday and traditional job search:

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So smart.

Think Netflix. That’s how Fridayd works. It’s intuitive. The Fridayd engine learns job seeker preferences and serves up the most relevant job search postings. Why does this matter? Most job search boards return a wide array of job search results, many of which are insignificant and cost the job seeker time to sort through them.

So streamlined.

Fridayd makes a job search efficient and stress-free, saving the job seeker on average 40 hours per month in job search time.

What can the job seekers do with all of that saved time? Focus on an existing day job; spend more time networking, preparing for interviews or developing skills; or enjoy family, friends or personal interests.

So sleek for the savvy job seeker.

Get started.