Staying Put Can Hurt Your Lifetime Earnings

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It wasn’t uncommon for members of previous generations to start and end their careers at the same place, never once switching employers. We’ve all heard the stories of employees who started in the mailroom or the factory floor and worked their way up to CEO. Upward mobility of that nature is rare today. Most people find they need to change employers to substantially advance their careers.

But career growth isn’t the only reason to keep moving. Compensation is a major motivator for switching jobs. In fact, cumulative earnings can be negatively impacted by staying put with the same employer.

Forbes estimates that employees who stay at a company for longer than two years will make 50% less over the lifetime of their career. Most companies give compensation increases of only 2-3% each year. Switching companies provides an opportunity for you to negotiate a higher salary and to be appreciated for the skills you have acquired over time.

Do you have to switch jobs to get a significant compensation increase? Not always. Some companies are good at making sure they not only develop their employees, but also compensate them fairly for their increased knowledge and responsibilities. But those companies are rare and that might be the slower path to advancement.

If it takes you five years to advance from coordinator to manager at a company you joined right out of college, you may be able to make that jump in three years by changing companies and command a higher salary at the same time.

If a starting salary is $40,000 and you are fortunate enough to get the high-end increase of 3%, you will still be earning under $44,000 three years later. Ask anyone who has sat across from a manager at performance review time receiving a measly jump in salary year after year. The heart-sinking news can be upsetting and also demotivating.

One problem lies outside of the restrictions companies place on the allotment of annual increase percentages. Managers often fail to see the level of growth an employee has achieved or won’t go to bat to secure a higher bump in salary for top talent. High performers won’t stay in one place for long. They’re smart. That’s one of the reasons they’re high performers to begin with. They’re astute enough to know their value and keep moving.

Job hopping on a resume isn’t always advisable when changing jobs happens every year, but it’s more the norm and not the exception to see two-year stints on the resumes of high potential talent.

 

 

 

Mobile Job Search Apps for Millennials on the Move

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One of the coolest things about millennials is that they embrace technology to get things done – faster. We could all take a page from their book when it comes to using apps and mobile solutions to help with job searching.

Searching for a job can be like a full-time job itself. It’s no surprise that anything that helps make search processes easier and that can be done on the move appeals to Generation Y. But these awesome tools should be in everyone’s back pocket, regardless of age.

From start to end, there is an app for almost every stage of your search.

Grammarly should be in anyone’s toolkit. Quick and easy to use, it can help catch spelling, grammar and punctuation mistakes on resumes, cover letters, thank you messages and follow-ups. Hiring managers will often toss out any candidate who can’t communicate properly and error-free.

For the more adventuresome, creative job seeker, Visualize.me enables users to turn text resumes into infographics in order to express their professional accomplishments in a simple, yet compelling, personal visualization. The jury is still out on recruiters’ preferences for visual resumes, and they aren’t always applicant- tracking-system friendly. But they’re cool to look at and can grab attention.

Have both job search and applications done for you with Fridayd, and keep your search organized in one place. On a mobile device, it’s just tap, touch and you’re done. You can decrease online job search time to 30 minutes or less per week.

Get help connecting to the right recruiter or hiring manager using Mentat. One of the best ways to get noticed is to send an email to the right contact after applying online. Mentat can help identify the best person to reach out to.

The go-to for checking out company reviews and ratings is Glassdoor. It’s especially useful for interview research and understanding how happy employees are with CEOs and the company’s culture. Glassdoor also lists job opportunities. Check it out.

There really is an app for everything. You can prepare for interviews and practice responses to interview questions with the Interview Prep Questions app.

And when it’s all said and done and you’ve landed your dream job, there is the Spafinder Wellness 365 app to help you find a massage and take a deep breath, or an app to treat yourself to almost anything.

App up your job search!

 

 

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What’s Good About a Bad Corporate Culture?

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Employees leave companies because of bad bosses, but they also exit because of bad cultures. What constitutes a culture gone wrong? Negativity, lack of recognition, all work and no play, stagnant personal growth, disrespect, mistrust, low engagement and suppressed innovation can all sour a workplace persona.

The only good thing about a bad culture is that it can change.

According to Maria Hernandez, founder of InnoGuía and a business coach who helps individuals, teams and companies to create cultures of engagement and innovation, “It’s not easy to transform a deeply rooted culture, but it can be done with the right mindset and coaching.”

Corporate cultures, like all cultures, have at their core a set of beliefs and related behaviors that get reinforced and perpetuated over time. For a culture to change, beliefs at the individual level have to undergo revision, starting with those of company leaders who have the most influence within an organization and who set examples for other employees to follow. “Coaching is a great start,” said Hernandez, “but the newly evangelized have to walk the talk.”

Hernandez views the coaching she does as preventative as much as a cure. “Companies should begin learning how to emanate aspects of other great places to work and start educating employees before a culture is tainted. It’s far more cost-effective to get everyone on the culture bus early than it is to replace talent due to constant turnover. “

Operating from the premise that employees who are respected, feel connected, are free to innovate, and have a sense of contribution will be more passionate as well as happier, Hernandez has seen through experience that those cultural attributes can be learned. Performance improves and so do bottom line results.

Employees often don’t realize the power they have to be agents of change and even influence culture from the bottom up. That’s why coaching also has to be pervasive and company-wide for teams and even one-on-one. If everyone can learn to work with integrity, inspiration, innovation and collaboration for a common cause, powerful transformation can occur.

Third-party training can bring the greatest benefits to a business. Employees are more likely to listen to a credible, outside source than a peer or supervisor. Once a corporate team learns new skills and consistently uses them, however, they become mutual reciprocity influencers to help build and foster a revived culture.

 

 

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The One Most Often Overlooked Interview Question

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Job seekers prepare for every interview question imaginable and have their own long list of questions to ask in return, omitting one that they frequently fail to address: “What is the office space like for this position; where will I sit?”

Most job seekers are concerned about job requirements, salary and benefits, not taking into account how the physical environment can impact job satisfaction and success. And, then there is the eagerness to simply land the offer and not wanting to appear too particular or pushy in the interview by asking about office details.

If you are not offered a tour of the facility before the offer phase, ask for one. There’s nothing wrong with wanting the full picture of your potential work experience before deciding to join a company. Ask if the person filling the role will have a private office, a cubicle or sit in today’s more trendy open shared space. There are pros and cons for each, but it can be a shock going from an office with a door to a large, wide-open room with no dividers.

Rare is the employee who wouldn’t opt for a private office, but there can be advantages to working in cool, Silicon Valley-style office without barriers, including increased transparency, collaboration and team cohesion. Truth be known, however, the greatest advantage for companies that build open-plan offices can be cost. Fewer walls and cubicle dividers mean less expensive construction.

But the true costs can be the exact opposite of the intended benefits: more distraction, lower productivity, increased illness spread through close contact, conflict among employees and decreased morale.

If you love the new opportunity but the workspace isn’t ideal, you may be able to use it as an additional bargaining chip. It could help you negotiate more remote work time, for instance, as a tradeoff.

Take your new work environment into serious consideration before signing on with a company. It can impact more than your ability to produce optimally and succeed, including taking a toll on your emotional and physical health.

 

 

 

 

What You Should Know Before Signing a Severance Agreement

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More than 2 million Americans voluntarily leave their jobs every month in the US, with millions more leaving involuntarily through termination. Rare is the case of an employee collecting a cushy severance package when exiting of their own volition. Unless, of course, it pays for a company to help transition an employee who resigns and, for example, may be a holder of critical company information. A nice monetary send-off may help tighten potential loose lips or ensure continued good relationships.

Of the millions and millions of other employees who are off boarded involuntarily, most generally walk away with very little or nothing, unless they hold upper-middle or senior-level positions with significant years of service to warrant a severance pay out or they are part of a larger layoff or downsizing and a company wants to prevent bad press that could result form sending off employees without assistance. In the latter instance, assistance may not be monetary in nature, but rather career counseling, resume writing or cover letter preparation.

In the devastating moment of job loss, a monetary severance can help ease the pain and provide a cushion while finding new employment. It can be a great benefit, making you eager to sign on the dotted line, but it’s also not without risks.

Most severance agreements include terms legally binding you to abide by them after you’ve signed the agreement, and most of those terms favor the employer, not you. For instance, you may be forbidden to take legal action against the employer or defame the company in any way. If you are fired for age discrimination or retaliation, you can’t bring suit against the company after you sign a severance agreement. Think twice and take your time before signing. Most agreements have a deadline and provide time for you to fully consider the terms.

If you also signed a non-compete agreement at the onset of your employment, you will most likely be unable to immediately find work in the same field. Signing a severance agreement may make it impossible to legally appeal the non-compete agreement even in cases of hardship in which you can’t find employment outside of your field.

If you are offered a severance package, heed the following advice:

  • Don’t sign a severance agreement unless you have to. If you have a nest egg, as most people should, to protect you in the event of losing a job, rely on that instead. You won’t be legally bound to the stringent restrictions built into most agreements and will be able to walk away with a greater degree of freedom.
  • Find a reputable labor attorney who can review the agreement and advise you before signing. A legal professional can walk you through all of the terms and make sure you understand the extent of the restrictions.
  • If you do need to sign an agreement, you may also be able to negotiate the terms before signing. You could secure more compensation or benefits for a greater period of time, instead of what is originally stated in the agreement.
  • Understand the consequences of what could happen if you do sign and then break your agreement. The penalties could be severe.

Whether or not you accept a severance agreement and the terms, walk away, move forward and commit to not disparaging the company. You want to heal from the experience. Speak favorably about the positives of your work experience and those you worked with. Protect yourself from potential libel and from having any negativity backfire on you with the company speaking unfavorably about you and your work.

Beware of Online Job Search Scammers

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Should You Provide Your Social Security Number on a Job Application?

It’s rare, but occasionally a job seeker may be asked to provide a social security number on a job application for background checks that could occur if a job offer is extended. Should you provide it?

No. Never. Definitely not.

An employer shouldn’t be conducting any background screening until the formal job offer stage, at which time references are contacted and credit checks sand criminal reports are conducted.

Giving out your social security number in advance of an offer may result in discrimination on the part of the employer, giving them the ability to gather data on everything from financial information, divorce records, traffic violations, etc.

Recent news reports also indicate that giving out personal information, a social security number or bank account data may also put you at significant risk with online job search scammers preying on job seekers in order to commit identity theft.

Protect yourself. Follow a few safety guidelines:

  • Be leery of any offers for interviews that happen quickly after posting or submitting a resume.
  • Check out the interviewee in advance on LinkedIn and company websites.
  • Make sure the company is legit.
  • Don’t participate in a text message interview.
  • Never provide your personal details, such as social security number or bank account information until a bona fide offer from a reputable company is in hand.

Trick Your Brain to Get Started on a Dreaded Job or Project

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Humans procrastinate tasks and projects for a variety of reasons. Most people have conditioned themselves to postpone or ignore any number of activities because they:

  • have become conditioned to heightened arousal stemming from completing a task at the last minute,
  • have issues with fear, perceived failure, or
  • they avoid decision-making because they don’t want to make a mistake or take responsibility for their outcomes.

Whichever is the case, you can recondition yourself to tackle work without delay.

When it comes to work you are paid to perform, it doesn’t pay to put it off. It can cost you your productivity, your sense of accomplishment, your reputation and even your continued employment. Top talent employees are admired not only for their expertise, but also for their ability to get things done in a timely manner.

Recognizing your tendency to procrastinate is a first step to changing the maladaptive behavior. See it and admit it. Understanding why you do it – arousal response, fear/failure reaction or decision immobilization – gets you to the root cause. Finally, realizing the fallacy behind each can help deflate the power they have over you.

Deferring work until the last minute because you think you work better under pressure is an untruth. You may have more incentive to get busy because you are under the gun to meet a deadline, but it doesn’t result in improved work product. In fact, more errors are made under stress and little time is left for adequate review and correction. And procrastinating to the last minute never wins you team praise. Coworkers are more apt to be irritated by eleventh-hour deliverables.

Fear of not knowing how to tackle a job or worry about potential failure isn’t cause to hold off starting a project. The fear is a result of the story you tell yourself about a future event. Anxiety subsides once you dive in. And, it’s true; you learn by doing. Trust that you’ll have what you need, including knowledge, as you begin and progress through an assignment.

Postponement because of indecision creates approach-avoidance angst. The best way to beat it is to decide and move forward full speed ahead. Yes, you might make a wrong choice; no one gets it right 100 percent of the time. You’re human. Plus, once you take a stab in one direction, you can autocorrect and go in the opposite direction with time to spare. Just do it.

If procrastination is your Achilles’ heel, you can employee some techniques to kick your habit and shift into high gear.

  1. Disregard how you “feel.” Use your rational, intellectual barometer instead and get started anyway. Once you start a project, it’s never as bad as preconceived notions you had about it. Actually, it usually is far easier and brings great satisfaction to get on top of and complete. As far as feelings go, you’ll feel far better working on a job than shelving it. Using depression as an example, depressed individuals often state that they don’t feel like partaking in activities, but the very activities make them feel less depressed.
  2. Break your project into mini bits. It’s easier to tackle a smaller task than one gigantic one. You’ll feel better and better with each completed step. Even an outline of what you need to do is a small action that you can complete and celebrate. Schedule time on your calendar for each little stage of the project.
  3. Challenge your assumptions. You’ll find that you can disprove most of them when it comes to procrastination. Oddly enough, creativity begets more creativity. Magically, it’s as if just jumping in gets the wheels turning.

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Break Free From The Job Search Grind This Independence Day

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Take your life back, have more time and free yourself from the monotonous work of trying to land your dream job.

Let it go. We’ve got this.

Fridayd will not only find the most relevant job opportunities for you. We’ll complete and submit applications on your behalf, discover networking connections for targeted companies, track all of your processes and keep your job search moving.

No one wants to be shackled with the tedium of finding a new job. And you don’t have to be.

Register now to let Fridayd manage your search and take advantage of our Independence Day special rate of $39 for our standard plan or $69 for our premium plan.

And, hey, you’re not bound to stay with us. If you don’t like the results you get with Fridayd, you are free to cancel at any time.

*Offer ends Saturday, July 8.

 

Tips on Sidestepping the Salary History Question: New Legislation Helps

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In the recent past, some cities and states have already passed legislation to prevent employers from asking job candidates their salary history. It’s a great move for a couple of reasons.

Originally designed to promote equal pay for equal work, such legal measures go beyond attempts to narrow the pay gap for women in the workplace. All job seekers, regardless of gender, should understand how unfair the salary question is and know how to avoid it, especially in cities and states yet to prohibit it.

Your current or past salary has no bearing on what you should be paid in a new position. Period.

What should determine your salary?

The scope of responsibilities in the new position combined with the fair market value for the geographical region in which you will work should be the first factors in deciding salary. Next, levels of experience and expertise weigh in to setting compensation for a role.

Don’t go into an interview without knowing your worth based on market research. There are plenty of online tools, such as PayScale and Glassdoor, to help you calculate your value. But better yet, if your region doesn’t have legislation banning salary history questions, employ some sidestepping strategies.

Many companies request current and past salaries in their online applications. Leave that section blank if it is not a required field. If it is mandatory, you won’t be able to leave that field incomplete, but you can try using all zeros to bypass the system, leaving that question for later in the interview stage.

It’s true that some companies like to have your salary history to make sure your salary expectations don’t exceed their set range for a position and that time isn’t wasted interviewing non-viable candidates. The assumption is that a candidate with a higher salary won’t be satisfied receiving less. That’s not always accurate, however. Many employees find job satisfaction in the work that they do, not just the compensation they receive. An employer can avoid this altogether by being upfront about the salary range for the position. You can then indicate if that range is acceptable to you.

Your first interview with a company will most likely be a screening call with a recruiter, who in most cases will inquire about your salary. You’re in the hot seat. How do you respond without angering the recruiter by withholding information? You can kindly answer the question with some variation of the following:

  • Don’t provide your current salary, but rather provide the recruiter with your salary requirements. What you require and what the hiring company is willing to pay are the only aspects that need to be considered in ascertaining if your salary expectations are a fit for moving forward.
  • Ask for the salary range, or provide a range in which you are willing to consider for the role.
  • Provide a range for your current salary just like the hiring company does for the position they are trying to fill. There is nothing wrong with stating that your existing salary is in the fair market value range for the scope of your responsibilities and that your salary expectations are based on the job requirements and your level of experience. A company worth joining will compensate its employees accordingly.

No one likes the salary question or the salary negotiation stages of job searching. Companies in the know and those that compensate fairly will avoid asking for salary history and instead pay for the value of the job and the experience of the person filling it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Slick Way to Fly Your Job Search Under the Radar

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When you already have a job but are looking for another one, there is some good advice on how to keep you search under the radar and not send any red flags to an existing employer. Many tips, such as those offered by Forbes in “How To Conduct A Successful Stealth Job Search (Without Getting Fired),” may seem like common sense, yet those seeking new employment may not take them into consideration in their haste to move their job search along.

Another way to keep a job search on the QT and not risk its intrusion into your current job is to allow experts to manage your job search for you. With over 40 million passive, white-collar job seekers looking for new opportunities every month in the US, there is stiff competition for available jobs. In addition to adding hours to your day before or after work for your search, it can be tempting to try to stay on top of your search during work hours.

The reality is, you don’t have to, and there is every good reason not to, including a more efficient and less stressful job search experience.

Fridayd emerged as a way to primarily help passive job seekers by using technology combined with human support to take away the burden of searching for a new job while already employed. Using its unique approach, Fridayd:

  • conducts your search for you, while you stay focused on the job at hand
  • follows companies of interest for you
  • submits resumes and completes applications on your behalf
  • finds the appropriate networking connections for targeted companies
  • reduces online job search time to 30 minutes or less per week

You can keep your job search moving full steam ahead effectively and without drawing attraction to your planned exit ahead. While your sitting in a meeting with colleagues, you can secretly smile, knowing your job search is taking place behind the scenes.