The No-nonsense Guide to Networking Anyone Can Follow

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Networking is tops in business – and especially in searching for a new job. Yet, the very thought of cold introductions and engaging with a crowd of strangers isn’t everyone’s idea of fun. For all but the most extroverted professional, assertive initiatives, shaking hands and striking up conversations feels like work, especially when there is an agenda attached.

Networking doesn’t have to be so hard, though, advises Carlos Paz, CEO of Fridayd. For most people, one-on-one interactions are easier and more gratifying. To that end, think of your connections as individual touch points to start and nurture relationships because relationship-building is what networking in all about.

“Most people view networking as attending large-scale or formal events designed just for that purpose. Those events are great, but you may be able to make more headway with a more targeted approach when it comes to searching for a new job,” said Paz.

You can network anytime and anywhere with people you connect with in your daily life. Just mentioning your interest in landing a new position in casual conversations can be a great opener to discover new opportunities. Everyone knows someone who knows someone. You can be more deliberate in your approach, though, by connecting with people you think may have greater insights into available jobs.

Follow these easy steps to build targeted networking into your daily job search activities:

  • Reach out to one existing contact everyday by phone or email to stay in touch and ask about job openings they may be aware of. Ask if you can share your resume and if the connection will forward it on if he/she learns of a suitable opening. Email is a less-threating way to connect that even the most introverted job seeker can undertake. However, nothing beats an actual conversation by phone or in person. Continually rotate through your list of contacts so you stay top of mind with your friends, former colleagues and business associates.
  • Schedule lunch or coffee two times a week with existing contacts to nurture the relationships and discuss your search.
  • Find one activity of interest a week to get you out and mingling. It doesn’t have to be a business networking event. You can meet people pursuing any passion or interest. What’s key is weaving in the right job search questions in your conversations.
  • Strike up conversations with neighbors about positions you are seeking.
  • Directly email a recruiter at companies you apply to. Don’t just apply and think you’ve done all that you can do. Get your foot in the door, introduce yourself and start a relationship through email or even by phone. Note, however, that most recruiters may screen incoming calls. You may have a better chance grabbing attention with email.
  • Work your LinkedIn contacts like a honey badger. Don’t just reach out once. Check back often to see if your contacts know of any emerging positions. Ask for introductions to second and third connections who may be helpful in your search. Most professionals are willing to help, and you may get a chance to return the favor down the road. Don’t be shy about asking for assistance.
  • Research and discover recruiters at targeted companies that don’t currently have an open position. Introduce yourself and share your resume. Many positions don’t make it to the job posting stage. You can raise awareness of your interest and credentials in the event that a position does become available.

Face-to-face encounters are superior for connecting and creating new relationships in your job search, but you can still make an impression, form new alliances and nurture your contacts in other ways. “The most important thing,” said Paz, “is that you make networking a primary part of your job search activities and that you don’t slack in this area. There are so many communications channels to take advantage of; even super socially inhibited professionals can network easily.”

 

 

 

6 Tips to Prevent Burning Bridges When You Leave a Job

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The best way to leave a job that’s not working out is a voluntary exit. You resign, serve out your final weeks and gracefully walk away with relationships intact and in good standing. That’s the ideal, but it frequently doesn’t work out that way.

Companies let employees go for myriad of reasons: poor performance, personality differences, incompatible work styles or goals, decreased budgets, downsizing, mergers and acquisitions, etc. Employees exiting a company for these reasons can still leave with poise and dignity while preserving relationships.

Understandably, losing a job for any reason causes hurt, anger and grief, but feelings can be put aside for your greater long-term good. The following tips will help you if you find yourself in the position of losing a job.

  1. Regardless of whether you think you deserve to lose your job or not, accept the company’s decision; don’t fight it. Ask questions to clarify the reasons for the decision and to determine if there is something you could have done differently, but don’t let anger lead your ego into a caustic exchange of words that you can never take back. By the time your manager or the company gives you notice, the decision is already set in stone.
  2. Keep negativity at bay. Just as if you were leaving by choice, thank the manager or human resources representative for the opportunity you had to contribute and work together.
  3. Ask if there are any options to continue working on a contract basis. Even when a company lets an employee go because of team fit or personality conflicts, the employee’s talent may still be valued. If you can negotiate such a deal, it enables you to state on your resume that you are still employed in some capacity.
  4. Companies don’t like to fire employees. Those who conduct the termination may experience their own guilt and bad feelings. Ask if they have any referrals that can help you in your job search. You could be surprised by their willingness to help.
  5. Say only good things about the company and the people you no longer will work with. Refrain from writing a damaging Glassdoor review or making any destructive comments on social media. You may feel better in the moment that you are venting, but such airing of emotions only hurts you in the long run.
  6. Once you leave, have a cooling-off period before you engage with people who were former employees. It’s tempting to speak poorly of the company or those who let you go. And it keeps you immersed in the event rather than focused on moving forward, learning from the experience and being better for it.

Vow to find the lessons and the good in losing your job. Business relationships don’t always work out, but you can retain the connections you made and leave a position on a more positive note than you might imagine possible.

 

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The Secret to Finding Meaningful Work

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For some job seekers, finding work or a career that is meaningful is a job search objective. However, gratifying work may have multiple meanings from person to person.

Doing work that helps others, improves the world or aids in a human-interest cause is purposeful for many. Saving the planet, healing the sick, or fighting for justice are such altruistic pursuits. Yet others find meaning in being highly challenged to grow a company or generate more wealth.

An artist, musician, actor or writer may find meaning in the creative process, akin to how many feel using their dominant traits or skills, e.g., math, science, construction, mechanical, communication skills, etc.

Work seems to be most meaningful when you can combine top interests, skills and natural talents. Time flies and there is a sense of “flow” in the activities of work. It’s an almost magical experience in which work doesn’t feel like work.

But not everyone has that experience of work, nor the opportunity to spend their days immersed in what interests them most and to collect a paycheck for it. As it turns out, though, all work can have meaning with the right approach to it.

What’s the secret to making all work purposeful?

Just doing good work can create a sense of meaning and increased gratification. Likewise, viewing interactions with coworkers, customers and business partners as acts of service and kindness can bring joy and purpose to any job. Knowing that your work is contributing to building a company that provides for the livelihood of all its employees has worth, and doing the job before you, whatever it is, to support loved ones can have great import.

Oddly enough, trying to discover true interests or passions as they relate to work can also cause added pressure when searching for a new job. It’s a luxury that wasn’t always afforded to past generations.

Everyone wants to find their dream job, but almost everyone will at times do work that is not their ideal gig. Meaningful work, like many things, often depends on the attitude and gusto brought to it.

 

 

 

 

 

Take a Load Off Your Job Search

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What? You can have more fun and free time while finding your next career adventure? Yes, you can!

Vacations are so refreshing. You take a break from work, have fun and spend more time with the ones you love.

Fridayd for job search is just like that!

You leave all the work and worry behind and have more time for what matters most in your life.

  • Professional job search is done for you; Fridayd delivers the most relevant job postings from across the web and targeted company websites
  • With your approval, applications are submitted on your behalf
  • Networking connections are researched and provided to you
  • All job search activities are organized on one easy-to-access dashboard

On a mobile device, it’s just tap, touch and done. You can manage your job search processes in 30 minutes or less per week.

Get started now for a more carefree life and summer while your job search stays on track.

 

 

How Your Storytelling Could Impact Your Job Search

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If you’re sad on the inside, don’t expect to show up happy on the outside.

It’s an amazing phenomenon how our inside world gets projected outwardly. We seemingly communicate the way we think and feel not just in words and non-verbals by the way we carry ourselves, facial expressions and overall body language, but also in the confidence, energy and well-being we exude without our knowledge. What’s even more interesting is that it’s hard to mask a negative self-perception with external appearances. What’s buried inside leaks out subtly in expressions we may be unaware of and that others pick up on.

It’s almost as if there is an invisible communication and energy field that operates of its own accord and relays the context of our inner dialogue – the story we inwardly tell about ourselves.

Most people can relate to the following experience. You’re miffed at a friend, colleague or spouse, without his/her knowing that you’re angry. You camouflage what you are thinking with a smile and pleasantries and act as if nothing is wrong. Yet, tension builds. You can feel it, almost cut it with a knife. You can’t swim out of the undercurrent of your thoughts and feelings. They can pull you under even if the surface looks calm.

Our self-narrative is especially important when we seek a new career opportunity. It says more about us than we can say with words.

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This is more than just self talk, though. The inner ongoing story of success or failure we choose to feed ourselves creates the way we feel, and those feelings turn into an identity we relay to others, despite what our words, credentials and crisp new suit might say to the contrary.

Get yourself in the right frame of mind by adjusting your vision of yourself for your job search. Keeping a positive self-image when a job search goes on and on can be challenging, but job seekers need to be vigilant about how they interpret, judge and speak to themselves about the circumstances surrounding their search.

If you have to tell yourself a story about yourself, tell a good one!

It’s the one everyone else will hear too when they look at you.

No Matter How You Slice It, Here Is the Most Important Piece of the Job Search Pie

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A job search is made up of multiple processes, and some can really soak up more time than they should. What are the most important job search activities and how much time should you spend on each for the most streamlined and effective job search?

Surprisingly, many job seekers have the time allocations backwards and spend a significant amount of time online in their quest for the right job opportunities, with considerably more time apportioned to completing and submitting applications. Those are, unequivocally, the most time-consuming activities, and they have to be done; however, no more than 10 percent of job search time should be spent on them.

Yikes! Where should one allot the remaining 90 percent of time?

Take a look:

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Today’s savvy job seekers know that the majority of their time – at least 60 percent – should be spent networking: reaching out to existing contacts, making new ones and uncovering personnel at hiring companies of interest in order to stand out from other applicants and get a foot in the door.

Those on a quest for new employment should spend about 20 percent of their time researching and preparing for interviews and another 10 percent on actual interviews.

The truth is, most job seekers struggle with whittling down their online activities to a manageable degree in order to fit in the more differentiating actions. Why? Because even if you use job search boards with alerts to bring attention to new postings, job search boards don’t catch all of the opportunities and there are a lot of irrelevant postings to sift through to find the needle in the haystack. Job seekers will still find themselves frequently visiting multiple job search boards and company websites to find ideal opportunities, plus allotting more time for filling out applications. Wash. Rinse. Repeat. It’s exhausting.

As more and more job seekers are learning about the extreme benefits of upping their networking game, they are seeking new and better ways to cut online activity. Fridayd was founded for the sole purpose of freeing job seekers from tedious online activities so they can focus on what matters most and what will give them the most advantages in their search. And it works! Using Fridayd, job seekers can cut online processes to 30 minutes or less a week and save on average 40 hours per month.

That’s a tasty time-cutting treat worth trying!

Dig in and check it out.

Tap, Touch and Done. All Job Searches Should Be This Easy

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Why would a job seeker choose to have Fridayd handle their job search processes? For starters, Fridayd makes online job search activities quick and easy. A job seeker can spend 30 minutes or less per week reviewing and applying to jobs rather than hours and hours. On a mobile device, it’s just tap, touch and you’re done!

So simple.

Compare the difference of Friday and traditional job search:

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So smart.

Think Netflix. That’s how Fridayd works. It’s intuitive. The Fridayd engine learns job seeker preferences and serves up the most relevant job search postings. Why does this matter? Most job search boards return a wide array of job search results, many of which are insignificant and cost the job seeker time to sort through them.

So streamlined.

Fridayd makes a job search efficient and stress-free, saving the job seeker on average 40 hours per month in job search time.

What can the job seekers do with all of that saved time? Focus on an existing day job; spend more time networking, preparing for interviews or developing skills; or enjoy family, friends or personal interests.

So sleek for the savvy job seeker.

Get started.

This Is the Best Way for College Grads to Beat the Job Search Numbers Game

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Congratulations, new grads! You’ve worked long and hard on your accomplishment. Degree in hand, you are off and running into the job market – you and millions of other new graduates.

The competition is fierce. Even though the job outlook is relatively good for those leaving college behind and entering the workforce in 2017, finding a new job is not easy and my take some time.

It’s a numbers game when it comes to the applications you may need to submit to get an actual interview followed by a job offer. You may have to submit 100 applications to get 10 interviews that may yield only one bona fide offer. That may sound like a lot and may shatter illusions you have about the rapidity of landing your dream job now that you have the degree that you were sure would open all of the right doors.

But don’t be dismayed. Today’s job search activities involve more than just searching for and applying to jobs, such as networking. Plus, there is help with the tiresome job of finding the right opportunities and completing all of those applications. We’ll get to that, but first, here are some tips to keep your head above water and give you advantages in your search.

  • Have a realistic understanding of the how long it might take to find your first professional gig. Lucky are those that land their ideal job right out of the college gate, so expect your search to span months rather than weeks. It may take on average 7.5 months to find a new job for even the most skilled professional.
  • Take all of the help you can get from your university career services. Ask for help crafting your resume and cover letters.
  • Find a mentor. Ask a more seasoned professional for guidance in your search and career growth. People love to share their wisdom.
  • Work your contacts and build your network. Networking is key today. You should ideally spend most of your time on networking, interview preparation and career development and only 10 percent or less of your job search time on online activities. Start with who you know and ask them to introduce you to contacts in their own networks. Network with college professors, family friends and relatives, neighbors, your college classmates who have already landed positions – anyone who may help refer you for opportunities.
  • Get to know yourself. Understand your greatest strengths and develop a pitch to sell them.
  • Practice interviewing so that you sound natural and confident and can answer all of the tough questions in a positive light.
  • Create a job search support group of recent grads to share tips and provide positive encouragement throughout your search.
  • Believe in yourself. No matter how many rejections you get, there is a “yes” waiting for you out there. Stay the course.

Now back to the help you can get to win the numbers game and keep your job search on track. One way you can be more effective and efficient is not to just find job postings, but to find the right ones with little effort. The second is to eliminate the time spent completing applications.

Submitting applications is necessary. You can’t exclude that chore, but you can get it done without doing the work yourself. And let’s be honest; wouldn’t you rather spend your time doing more differentiating job search activities or doing whatever matters most to you?

This is where Fridayd comes in as a technology solution that searches for the most highly relevant job opportunities, completes and submits applications on your behalf, uncovers networking connections for you…and keeps your job search on course without missing a beat until you find the position that is right for you.

Hundo p this is the best way to keep your job search moving and beat the numbers game.

Get started.

You Could Land Your Next Job in Only 30 Minutes a Week

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It’s the perfect time to take your job search to a whole new level – without searching and applying yourself.

That’s right. We do the tedious, time-consuming dirty work for you, so you have more time for networking, or for whatever matters most in your life.

  • Get the most relevant job search postings curated just for you
  • Choose to have us apply on your behalf
  • Cut your online job search activity from hours and hours to as little as 30 minutes a week

Register today.

Now through May 1, 2017, we’re slashing our normal rates to give your job search a big boost, and if you register by the deadline, your monthly rate won’t increase.

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Sign up now. You can’t get job search help like this anywhere else. Find your next big career adventure without the stress and work of going it alone.

5 Tips for Measuring a Company’s Engagement…Before You Take the Job

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Fifty-one percent of employees in the U.S. are actively looking for a new job. That’s more than half, according to Gallup’s 2017 State of the American Workplace report. And that’s huge.

The biggest cause: employee engagement, or lack thereof. Seventy percent of U.S. employees are not engaged at work.

Disengagement can be an individual employee’s problem, for a number of reasons, such as personal challenges outside of work that serve as distractions, lack of interest in the work performed, ability to perform job functions, etc., but more often than not, employee engagement is a companywide issue related to culture, a mission employees can embrace, communication, management style, workplace recognition, opportunities for growth and simply having the right tools and resources to perform tasks optimally.

As a job seeker, a hiring company’s track record on engagement is an important element to consider in choosing to team up. You are more apt to work to your full potential at a company with a high level of engagement. But how do you measure employee engagement before you accept the offer?

Pose the Question

Ask the recruiter, the hiring manager and anyone who interviews you specifically about engagement and what the company does to promote it. Gallup has twelve questions companies can ask employees to help measure engagement:

  • I know what is expected of me at work.
  • At work, my opinions seem to count.
  • I have the materials and equipment I need to do my work right.
  • The mission or purpose of my company makes me feel my job is important.
  • At work, I have the opportunity to do what I do best every day.
  • My associates or fellow employees are committed to doing quality work.
  • In the last seven days, I have received recognition or praise for doing good work.
  • I have a best friend at work.
  • My supervisor, or someone at work, seems to care about me as a person.
  • In the last six months, someone at work has talked to me about my progress.
  • There is someone at work who encourages my development.
  • This last year, I have had opportunities at work to learn and grow.

You won’t ask these questions, but they give you a good idea of what you want in an engaged workplace. You can ask related questions, such as how the employees are recognized, how performance and progress are measured, how employees feel about and embrace the company’s mission, what the company does to create a shared vision, and how employees are mentored or developed.

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Turnover Rate

It’s an old, but not outdated, question to ask. It can be an indicator of troubled waters within. Don’t stop at asking for the rate alone. Ask about underlying causes.

What’s a good turnover rate? It’s not one-size-fits-all and depends on the industry. The hospitality and restaurant industries have higher turnover rates in general as a result of the transient nature of the workforce. For example, high school and college students may fill hourly, unskilled labor positions. Turnover rates may be 16-17 percent for all industries as an average, but hospitality may have as much as 37 percent. If you are considering a professional role in such an industry, you can drill down and ask about turnover rates for their management workforce instead.

Employee Reviews

People talk, and in the age of social media, they have a platform to be heard. Glassdoor gives employees the opportunity to rate an organization. Keep in mind, however, that a disgruntled employee or even a job candidate may give a skewed review. Look for a repeated theme of negativity. Additionally, a small number of reviews won’t give you an accurate picture. Five reviews won’t tell you as much as 150 will. Look for other clues too on other social media platforms. A search on Twitter with a hash tag in front of a company name may reveal some surprising insights.

Ask Insiders

Ask existing contacts at the hiring company about their personal experiences, and more specifically ask about their sense of engagement. Do your networking homework and find other contacts working for the organization who may be willing to have a conversation with you.

The Golden Cup

Check a company’s awards and accolades for being a best pace to work and awards for engagement. Some awards and winners include:

Achievers Engaged Workplace Awards

Gallup Most Engaged Workplaces

Fortune Great Place to Work

Glassdoor Employee Choice Awards

Additionally, most local and regional business journals and newspapers host awards for best workplaces as do industry associations. Bear in mind that such awards are achieved through employee surveys and feedback. An award may measure many aspects of workplace, though, such as benefits, and may not measure true engagement, so use multiple channels to gather information on engagement to get an accurate account.

Moreover, just because a company is not on an award list, doesn’t mean it is not a great place to work or that it doesn’t have an engaged workforce. Companies apply to awards; they are not nominated by the award-granting entity.